Creating attachments to your art

November 17, 2015

As artists we create our art not only because we love what we do, but to sell, so someone else can enjoy it. Sometimes there are those special creations that we hold near and dear and are harder to let go of. We’ve had our share of those and every once in a while we may keep one. But most of the time we have to part with a favorite piece, because someone else falls in love with it as much as we did.

The newest pieces we just completed were no exception. The finish barely had time to dry before they were out the door and gone. A visit to a new wholesale account proved that attachments can be fleeting. So those new pieces will find wonderful homes and we’ll move on to create more one of a kind sculptures for more people.

Mesquite burl tunnel

One such piece to not be around long is this Mesquite Burl Tunnel. The incredible burling of the mesquite is pretty rare and such a find. Scott carved two tunnels on either end with a large opening in the middle. This piece had such natural beauty and so many inclusions, cracks and voids, that we decided to not add any inlay. That was definitely the right choice on this piece.

Soon we head to Arizona again for the 10 week show. However, this year we will be heading back to the Arizona Fine Art Expo that we did a few years ago. An opportunity was presented to us by our good friends, painter TJ and Lori Thompson ( to split a double booth. He takes the walls and we get the floor. This gallery type setup should look incredible and allow us to really show off our sculptures. Switching back to Arizona Fine Art Expo also allows us to work a lot better, meaning we will be able to build a good inventory for next years summer shows. We look forward to this booth setup with our good friends TJ and Lori and getting reacquainted with all the other artists at Expo. Arizona Fine Art Expo starts January 22 and ends April 3rd 2016 and takes place at the NW corner of Scottsdale Rd and Jomax Rd. For more info on the show go to

Here are a few more of those new pieces


“Dazzle” was one of the pieces just completed. It was a nice wavy vessel carved from Acacia, with the bark carefully left in place and has turquoise inlayed. It resembles mesquite in many ways with the yellow sap wood.

Ironwood Tunnel

This Tunnel vessel was carved from AZ Ironwood. A long tunnel was carved through the piece and a small bowl shape was carved on the top. Then the large cracks that filled the piece were filled with turquoise. Yes that is the natural color of that wood. It’s incredible.

turquoise stone vessel

This was just one of the smaller pieces from our new “Topper” designs. We started creating them to reach a larger audience of collectors with small to medium sized vessels. These hollowed out vessels have different features incorporated like, gold leafing, copper or bronze patina and stone inlays. The toppers vary from a stone, gem, geode, rocks and more. This one was carved from Mesquite, has turquoise inlayed and the hand made topper has a turquoise rock on it. We have fun with these pieces, adding some kind of unique artistic touch.


Some of you, from Face Book, might remember this Oak Burl in the beginning stage, when we were getting your opinion on whether to load it with turquoise or just slightly add it. Well I went in between and did a fair amount of turquoise, but didn’t totally load it. I think the finished piece speaks for itself. It’s GORGEOUS.

We’ll be working on creating some very exciting sculptures in various sizes, along with a good assortment of small to medium vessels over the next two months. I’m sure time will fly by before leaving for AZ, so there are no plans to do anything, but work work work.

The Art of Creativity

June 29, 2015

CREATIVITY. Some are born with it, some work very hard to try and achieve it. Scott was blessed with a very creative mind and works hard to constantly improve his skills and keep the creativity flowing. Being creative and thinking of new designs and ideas seems to come easy for some, like Scott. That is why he enjoys carving the sculptures. He is always thinking and talking sculpture. It definitely consumes our lives. But we are glad we chose this lifestyle for a living. Not many can do it. It is definitely not easy. But nothing worthwhile in life is easy. You have to work hard for it. Mold it. Feed it. Sacrifice for it. That is what it’s like being an artist.

scott working resize

So how does Scott’s creative process start? From a LOG. He can look at a log and have an idea in mind of what that log will soon become. He very rarely sketches his ideas. He just thinks of it and starts working. He then picks up a chainsaw and sets out creating that design. When the rough process is done, he switches over to grinders. The above picture is a 6ft tall sculpture that is currently in the carving stage. It was a very large mesquite log that Scott picked up from a woodturner friend in Scottsdale. The log was so large and heavy, he had to rough carve it there, before loading it on the trailer and transporting it back home. The sculpture will have several tunnels with large wavy openings carved into it and will stand on a cement base. It will be completed in time for the Sculpture in the Park show, in Loveland CO, August 8-9. It is sure to be a real spectacular piece.

Vision resize

Even though some artists are born with the creative bug, it doesn’t mean they don’t have to work hard for it from time to time. It does take practice, patience and discipline to keep those creative juices going. That is why we have so many logs on hand, that range in the type of wood and size. Sometimes the design jumps out at you like when Scott saw the Ironwood log that would soon become “Vision” (Pictured above), he knew instantly what he wanted to do with it. He carved down the branches that were coming out to create tunnels and carefully incorporated the yellow sap wood to make it wrap around the tunnels. It turned out spectacular. But there are other times when he can stare at a log and not have any idea what he wants to do with it. So it sits till one day that vision finally forms. And we have quite a few of those waiting logs. Yet other times he has an idea in mind and sets out hunting for that perfect log to create that idea.


“NESTLED” above is one of those, “I have an idea, let me find the right logs”. It consisted of several pieces that are specially carved to nestle into each other. The main pieces are made from mesquite. Then there is a small juniper and ironwood piece that snuggle in small openings. Multi stones were inlayed to add a lot of color and two gold leaf balls add some whimsy. Scott has plans to do several of these out of different woods and in various sizes. He also wants to do wall sculptures that are similar in design. We are always striving to improve and stay one step ahead.

So being creative does take work and constant practice to perfect your skills. Even if you are born with the creative bug. It can also be very satisfying and rewarding and we wouldn’t trade the life for anything.

Wall Sculptures take on a new meaning

March 2, 2015

Our creative process is always evolving and improving. Recently we created new wall sculptures to add to the carved vessels and sculptures. The ideas keep flowing from Scott’s creative mind and he never ceases to surprise me. He recently changed out the wood backers on the wall sculptures with aluminum. A grinder was used to add lines and swirls to the aluminum to give it texture. The contrast between the wood and the aluminum really makes them pop and gives a more contemporary look. Already they are getting a lot of attention, in just one day. Currently they are on display at the 10 week show, Celebration of Fine Art, in Scottsdale, AZ. The show has four more weeks and ends on March 29th.

Bubinga wall piece 2

This wall sculpture features Bubinga wood

zebra wood wall piece

This wall sculpture features Zebra wood

Other wall sculptures that we recently created have patina copper backers. They are also very unique in that they also include other materials. This first one was carved from Apple wood. It features an Onyx ball that sends ripples out from the splash it created. Gentle ripples in various sizes were carved to create this sculpture and achieve the look. The green in the patina copper brings out the green in the onyx ball and the apple wood and makes it pop.


This next wall sculpture was carved from cherry wood. Abalone shell, along with other sea shells and rocks were added to the piece. Waves were carved around these pieces, creating a tide pool effect. The blue patina copper makes the colors in the abalone shell stand out and adds color to the sculpture.

Tide Pool

This next wall piece is a unique collaboration between Scott and another artist, Kathleen Hope. Her work in mixed media, mostly cement adds a completely different element to our carved wood. The vibrant blue and the white parchment are a beautiful contrast with the carved walnut.

collaboration wall piece

Another collaboration Scott did was with artist, Whitney Peckman. Her incredible embellished guard art was a great fit with our work. Scott carved on a piece of Osage Orange wood and Whitney created beautiful yellow Iris’s and leaves on it. This piece has a 3D look, giving the wall sculpture life.

Iris sculpture

To see more of our wall sculptures or other work, please visit our website.
To see information on Celebration of Fine Art in Scottsdale, visit

Chairs and Carving Stone, Oh My!

December 14, 2014

It’s been another busy year for us here in the land of Shangrila. A year of chairs and Sculptures. We tried a new experiment with our summer shows, of bringing only the carved sculptures. And it paid off. We finished our summer shows wiped out of inventory. And on top of that, we got quite a few chair orders off the internet. So all my hard work on the website and getting us out there in the world wide web, paid off.

A Rocken Mom
One exciting thing was a last minute rocking chair order for an expectant mother. A surprise from the husband and a few custom ideas turned out a beautiful rocker. It was made from highly figured black walnut with Koa accents.
hester wife close up
Here mom to be is trying out the rocker for the first time. It’s arrival was just in time for her to go into labor. So we couldn’t have timed that any closer. We’re glad that baby and mom can enjoy the rocker.

Eight is Enough
This next photo is the set of 8 Black Walnut Horn Back chairs that we just finished up in time to used for Christmas dinner.
Green 8 chairs

Big Collector
We finished up an order for a big collector that included 6 chairs. The black walnut with purple heart horn back chairs finished up this table set.
Adam table set

His collection includes the below pieces.
Adam hemisphere table
This walnut Hemisphere table has purple heart bread board ends.
Adam settee
Walnut Settee
Adam hinge table
Walnut rocker and a mesquite wooden hinge pedestal table
Adam coat rack
Mahogany carved coat rack
Adam sculpture
Juniper Carved Sculpture

Carving Stone
We have been enjoying carving in the Alabaster Stone and Scott has gotten quite creative. We recently picked up some different colors in the stone, like Transparent Orange and Peach. We should have a nice variety of Alabaster pieces this next year at Celebration of Fine Art, like this tunnel piece, “Three Ways Through”.
Three Ways Thru

Even though we are scrambling to get new pieces done for Celebration, because we had such a busy year, we count ourselves very blessed. It’s been a very busy year both with the business and at the homefront with all the projects we’ve had going on at home. We’re looking forward to next year and what surprises it holds.

Carving Alabaster

July 3, 2014


The Alabaster Stone in large 90# blocks, ready for something creative to take place and reveal the beauty within.

Recently we started carving Alabaster stone. We’ve been wanting to try it out for some time.  Although it can be carved and sanded with the same tools, it has proven to be more challenging and quite a bit messier. Just like “Pig Pen” from the Peanuts cartoon, a white cloud follows us when we work with it. Scott has found that he unfortunately can’t use the chainsaw on it, due to the aggressive nature of it because the stone will break apart much easier. So it takes longer to use the grinders to carve intricate designs. And due to the hairline cracks that may exist in the stone, he has to be careful during the carving process or the whole piece will just crack wide open. We are enjoying the new medium and the different element it allows us to show. Scott’s creative juices can really flow and grow carving the stone.


The color variations in the Alabaster is incredible. The above bowl was made from the Pink Alabaster and has Ebony wood on the rim. This was one of the first pieces Scott carved. He created some curves and gentle waves to bring out the beautiful colors. The Ebony wood rim adds an incredible contrast between the colors.

grey alabaster vessel

This piece was one of the most recent created. It is a Grey Alabaster. The stone was odd shaped, so this canyon shape was created. The grey stone has a different array of colors going through, like, green, tan, white and grey.

purple heart and alabaster

This was also carved from a small piece of the Grey Alabaster and has Purple Heart on the rim.

three ways through

This beauty was carved from a large block of the Red Alabaster and has Bubinga wood attached to the tunnel openings and used for the base. Three tunnels were carved out of the stone creating this incredible sculpture. The red of the Bubinga shows off all the red tones in the stones. You have to see this piece in person to really appreciate how beautiful it is.

Year of Big Orders

December 22, 2013

This year has been a year for bigger orders for us. After arriving home from our 3 month adventure at Celebration of Fine Art in April, we took off on an order for 12 Greek God chairs and 2 Shangrila II rockers. All were made from gorgeous black walnut. This order went to a beautiful new home in Midland TX. Here are some magazine quality photos the customer sent of all the chairs around their two tables and one of the rockers. We feel honored to have our chairs in this Texas sized home that is so lovingly decorated by its owners Matt and Kristina.

johnson chairs

This shot shows all 12 chairs around their two round tables. I love those gorgeous doors in the background.

johnson chair

This is a photo of a single Greek God chair out of walnut

johnson chair set

This photo looks like it came straight out of a magazine with a great shot of the entire room with the chairs in the background

johnson rocker

Here is one of the rockers downstairs. I love the rug underneath and the backdrop of the stairs.

solomon at johnson house

This is their great dane Solomon, looking so handsome with the chairs behind him. I just had to include this photo.

Our last big order of the year was a bedroom ensemble that went to Breckenridge CO. Breckenridge is our favorite CO town with all its quaintness and beauty. The ensemble consisted of a king size bed with night stands, two bent wood rockers with an end table, a low back chair and to be delivered in the spring is a custom desk. Everything was a combination of black walnut and tiger maple. It was such a striking combo and sure to be a stand out in this mountain home. Even though we had our challenges while working on this order, between getting sick and the very cold weather slowing us down, it went out the door last week and made it to CO in time for their Christmas family gathering. Here are some pictures that the designer, Cindy Gray of Interiors by Design in Breckenridge sent us.

bennett bed complete

This is the King Size bed out of black walnut with the tiger maple on the inset. The two nightstands are on either side of the bed out of the same wood.

bennett bed and nightstand

Here is a side shot

bennett rockers

The two bent wood rockers and the little end table sit facing the fireplace. Such a cozy setting.

bennett low back chair

This is where the desk will go with the low back chair.

bennett rocker and end table

Here is a nice shot of a rocker with the bed in the background

Now we can get down to getting ready to leave for three months in AZ to exhibit at Celebration of Fine Art. There is lots to do in such a short amount of time. But we’re looking forward to going, seeing old friends and customers and being in a warm climate. We’ll see how our two baby boys do out of their home setting. They should make lots of new two and four legged friends. The show starts on January 11th and goes till March 23rd. We plan to have many outstanding furniture and sculpture pieces at the show; along with creating many new sculpture pieces while we’re there. So if you can make it to the show, stop by and say hi and see what we have available. I will also be posting on our blog and facebook throughout the show, if you want to keep up on what we’re creating.

Fall Happenings and the Bending Process of the Bentwood Rocker

November 16, 2013

It’s been a busy fall here for us here in the land of Shangrila. Our two new little boys, Apollo and Perseus (pictured below checking out the shop) are growing like weeds (up to about 80 & 90lbs at just over 5 months old). They are keeping us very busy and entertained. But we’ve also been busy with customer orders, making a delivery to Mystique Gallery in Scottsdale and now getting ready for another 10 week adventure in AZ at Celebration of Fine Art. We just finished up a desk chair for a NM customer and are underway on a large bedroom order going to a new home in Breckenridge CO.  This large order not only has a king size bed with night stands, but a desk and low back chair and two bent wood rockers. The bending involved in making one of these unique rockers is quite a task. In this blog I will show some of the steps in the creative process.

boys in shop

Apollo and Perseus at 4 months old, checking out the shop. They love to see what’s going on and pick up pieces of wood to chew on.


Here is a completed Bent wood rocker made from Cherry and Ash

The first process is prepping for all the gluing of the legs. This process has to take place before it gets to cold. So we were in a crunch to get all the major gluing done before winter hits. Luckily our weather has been gorgeous and not to cold, which is unusual for this time of year. Scott also changed how the glue up goes on the legs, making each leg of the rocker, three separate glue ups. This may take more time, but makes it a little easier and a much stronger bend.

Once the three bends are complete, the arm gets glued up on a separate form that lies on the leg. Normally we use contrasting woods, to really show off the whole process.

The seat and headrest (normally the same wood as the arms) are glued up, carved and shaped and then the process of putting the rocker together and shaping it, takes place. Even though the bending process of this rocker is very time-consuming and hard, the unique design makes this rocker like no other out there. It’s not the typical classic look, but has a more modern design.

bennett runner strips

This is a set of 9ft long strips ready for the first glue up.

bennett 1st runner glueup

Laminated strips glued up on the form. A lot of clamps go into this glue up. It takes both of us almost hour to do the glue up.

bennett 1st runner

This is what the first glue up looks like when taken out of the form.

bennett 2nd runner glueup

Here is the second glue up. This glue up is a little shorter than the first, building up the middle section of the leg, to make it stronger.

bennett runner glueup closeup

Close up of the second glue up

rocker legs 2nd glueups

Now four rocker legs are glued up and ready for the 3rd and final glue up to beef up the curve area.

final glue up on rocker leg

This is the last of the glue ups on the legs. A small section of laminations is glued on to the curve to make it stronger.

rocker laminated back slat

While some of the legs are being glued up, the laminations for the backrest are cut. Here we have walnut with ash in the middle. The contrasting woods blend in with the rest of the rocker and the ash in the middle of each backrest make them even stronger. These will be flexible backrests, that will flex as you rock.

glue up of rocker spindles

Here is two backrests being glued up on the form. This form was especially made to fit the curve of the back.

cutting rocker leg

Here is Scott trimming up the sides of the rocker leg. It is quite a cut on the bandsaw.

runner sanded

This is what the rocker leg looks like with all the bends glued on and sanded flat. Now it’s ready to attach the arm.

arm form

This is the arm form clamped on to the runner. This form is specially made to get a nice comfortable sweep while rocking.

arm glued up

The arm is now glued on to one of the legs. It’s a tricky glue up due to the curve and takes about an hour from start to finish.

rocker arms

Here you can really see the contrast in the woods, with the walnut arms glued on for one rocker. Next the seat gets attached, then the headrest and back spindles. And finally all the sanding and finishing. Stay tuned for the next blog, showing the completed rockers made from walnut and ash, along with the other bedroom furniture.

Shangri-La Woodworks, Scott and Stephanie Shangraw, HC 61 Box 40

This was our first bent wood rocker made from walnut and mesquite.

New Babies and Chair Delivery

July 25, 2013

It’s been a busy few months. We just completed a large chair order and delivered it to Midland. It consisted of 12 Greek God chairs and 2 Shangrila II Rockers. All made from Oregon Black Walnut. The delivery went smoothly, even though it rained my whole drive there. The rain stopped just long enough to unload and then it started right up. Couldn’t have timed it better. We are now getting ready for our three summer shows. The first takes place in Park City UT August 3-4. Then the next weekend is the Sculpture Show in Loveland CO August 10-11. The last show will be Sausalito Art Fest in Sausalito CA over Labor Day weekend. We are scrambling to create more unique and new pieces for these shows.

Not only are we busy with all this, but we just got two 9 week old Merle great dane puppies. The brothers names are Apollo and Perseus. They are a handful, but so much fun as well. Their training is underway and they are catching on real quick. Now if I can just get them to quit chewing on any piece of wood they can find. Lord knows we have a lot of that around here. Hopefully once the teething stage is done. Traveling will be more of a challenge. So Scott will have to go to some shows by himself. But hopefully as they get older we can take them to more places with us and get them used to it. Below are some pictures of them.

Boys in vehicle 3

The boys sleeping on the car ride home. They were so good and slept most of the way.

Boys at home 2

Here they are sleeping at home. They already have quite a few toys. Perseus is suckling on a squeakie toy.

Apollo sleeping

This is Apollo sleeping. He is a lighter grey with black markings.

Perseus sleeping

This is Perseus sleeping. He’s dark grey with black markings.

Seems like they do nothing but sleep, eat and poop right now. There is some rough housing in between. They are going to grow like weeds though. It’s quite amazing. Lukly their parents are not real big danes, so these guys won’t be giants. We are so enjoying them and glad we got them. They make us laugh all the time.

Here is the chair delivery to Midland TX. Their house isn’t quite finished, but when it is I will post more pictures. I can’t wait to see everything in their place and how beautiful the house is.

Matt Johnson carrying chair

Here Is Matt carrying in one of the Greek God chairs

johnson chairs delivered

This is all 12 chairs

johnson rockers in home

The 2 Rockers

Matt Johnson sitting in rocker

Matt trying out a rocker

This was a big order and we have to admit took a little longer than we had planned. But seeing them all complete is well worth it. And it is especially satisfying to know the customer is happy.

Life at the 10 week Celebration of Fine Art Show

February 24, 2013

Things have been moving along here at the Celebration of Fine Art Show in Scottsdale. We only have 4 weeks left. The weather has been a bit wacky, but the patrons are still coming out in good numbers. We are really enjoying ourselves and making great new friends here. We miss some of our friends from last years show, but we get together from time to time to catch up and share a few good laughs. The artists and promoters at Celebration are so friendly, professional and hard working and the artwork is incredible. This gallery setting show is like no other in the country and has some of the best artists around.

Booth shot

A shot of our booth. We also have a workspace outside where we can work on new pieces. We’ve already created many new pieces while here.

Below Scott is working on a four tunnel vessel made from Mesquite Burl.

scott working on 4 ways through

Here is “4 Tunnels Through” complete. It is gorgeous.

4 tunnels through


“Rejoice” was made from Ironwood. This is a beauty. It stands about 20″ tall with the copper base and 15″ wide. The wood is so dense and hard to work with, but has incredible color in it. And the turquoise really stands out on it as well.

"Root of Delight"

“Root of Delight” was carved from an Alligator Juniper Burl. Scott incorporated the root section into the carving and I inlayed turquoise into all the very fine cracks that exhisted all over this piece.

Iron Dancer and painting

“Iron Dancer” is a piece we finished before the show. It inspired a painter, Maia Leisz, here at the show to paint it and it turned out fabulous. She has painted a few of our pieces.

Maia painting

Here is Maia Leisz painting a collaborative piece with several artists works, including one of ours. She had so much fun with this. She is the happiest, most bubbly person at the show. I tell her she’s infectious. And that’s a good thing.

Joe Woodford

This is potter Joe Woodford taking a piece out of the kiln and doing his Rakuu method. It is amazing to watch him do the process. He puts a firemens outfit on, uses these huge tongs and carries a piece to a pit, where he then covers it with a can, stuffs newspaper in a hole and kicks dirt around to smother all the air.  You have to watch this process to fully appreciate it.

Even though we are extremely busy here at the show, we’re having fun, meeting new customers and making great friends. We’re creating some wonderful new designs and thinking of other things to do for when we come back next year. It’s a long 10 weeks, but we wouldn’t trade it for anything.

Trip to Oregon

November 11, 2012

One of the places that was on our bucket list was Oregon, and we finally got to make a trip there recently. With the passing of our beloved Sampson, we needed to escape home and the void he left. So instead of shipping a bubinga rocker to Primary Elements Gallery in Cannon Beach, we made a last-minute decision to deliver it ourselves, along with a few carved vessels and bowls. The drive was long and we pushed it in two days and arrived in Astoria at our hotel, on the river late at night. The drive was a little boring and our mood was quiet. We’re both missing Sampson so much and he is always on our minds. But we were excited to see Oregon for the first time. They don’t call it a rainy state for nothing. It started raining almost the minute we drove into the state, continued the three days we were there and most of the drive out of the state. It was quite foggy upon arrival and made it hard to see. The Columbus river was quite spectacular with its grand size, dividing Oregon and Washington states and running almost the entire length of Oregon till it hit the ocean. There were several large barges running up and down the river. Our room in Astoria had a view of the river and the large bridges that run over to Washington state and to the rest of the Oregon coast. Our first day there, we looked around Astoria and had to admit it wasn’t what we expected. I had always wanted to go there (being a fan of the movie “Goonies” and “Kindergarten Cop”) and I guess I had a different vision of what it would look like. We toured a few things, including the Oregon Film Museum that concentrates on the “Goonies” movie and it was a huge disappointment. We did have a nice lunch on the river at a fancy restaurant and watched some ships come and go, along with a few sea lions swimming by. That same day we went to the historic Fort Stevens, which was thick with trees and was where the river and the ocean met. It was quite pretty, but the ocean always is. We drooled over the washed up logs and contemplated on how to get some home. But you must have special permits and a way to load them. Maybe next time. They definitely get a lot of rain up there. Everything was covered with moss. The trees were loaded with it, even homes and rv’s. The rain and fog gave an eery feel to everything. Overall, we enjoyed our trip and look forward to going back and seeing more of Oregon.

Our second day was making the delivery of the rocker to the gallery in Cannon Beach. This was a cute little town and everything we had expected to see in this area. We wish we had chosen to stay here instead. Maybe next time. There were several galleries and shops in the downtown area with quite a few shoppers for a rainy day. We made the delivery and chatted with the owner of the gallery, Stephanie for a while. Yes we share the same first name. She is a vibrant, energetic, friendly lady and seems to love what she does. Her gallery had an array of different artwork, along with a nice selection of wood art. While we were there placing out our pieces, we chatted with a couple and they ended up buying one of our carved mesquite bowls. That was a nice start to what we hope to be a long relationship with Primary Elements and the owner Stephanie. The rest of the day, we looked around the town and some of the sights. Our final day encompassed yet more rain and fog. We toured the Seaside Aquarium and had fun feeding the sea lions on exhibit. They were quite entertaining and we enjoyed the aquarium. By then though we were so sick of being wet and not being able to see much, we headed back to our hotel and relaxed for the next days drive. We wish we had planned better to leave a little earlier and head south to the Redwoods. I believe we would have enjoyed that so much and driving along the coast would have been beautiful. So next time we’ll have to incorporate that in. We hope the gallery does good with our pieces and that we can make another trip up next year.

Now that we are home, we’ve been working on finishing up orders. We are making a trip to TX to make four deliveries and pick up mesquite logs from our friend and fellow woodworker Buddy Compton. Then it’s back home to work on a few more orders and what we will bring to the Celebration of Fine Art in AZ. This will be our first year at this 10 week show. Celebration is the original 10 week show, being around for 23 yrs, and it is an honor to be juried into this show. It is quite hard to get into and they have a big waiting list. We hope Celebration will be a big show for us and that we can continue going back each year. We will miss some of our friends that will be at the other 10 week show, but luckily we can see them here and there and catch up. We have a nice booth that looks out over the sculpture garden and an outdoor work area out on its own. Since we are messy and noisy we will be put in a different area, but just down from our booth. We leave home on January 4th and the show starts on January 12th and runs through March 24th. Scott and I will be there everyday working for the 10 weeks, so we hope to be able to replenish what we sale and make more for the shows after this one. The weather will be so nice and we wish we could leave now. I’m looking at lots of snow outside, with a night of minus temps ahead and dreaming of the warm weather in Scottsdale.

Next year should be an interesting one for us. We are going to load up on a few more shows and travel to some places we have wanted to go see. So we plan to be busy and hopefully have some fun as well.

View of Astoria bridge going over to Washington State

View of river and boardwalk from hotel

Fort Steven-Ocean and river meeting

Scott and the owner of the gallery, Stephanie

One of the carved juniper bowls on display in the gallery

Scott with a new customer and her birthday present, a mesquite carved bowl

Cannon Beach

Whale sculpture in Cannon Beach


Family and friends that know us well, know how much Sampson meant to Scott and I. Our world evolved around this beautiful giant baby and we miss him so. Our lives have been quite lonely with him gone and it will take a long time for us to heal from this loss. Here are a couple of the last pictures we took of him. We will meet again at “Rainbow Bridge” someday in the future.

Outside enjoying the beautiful weather with on of his squeakies given to him by our good friends Gilda and Larry and their dog Chino

Laying on his favorite blanky among all his many squeaky toys. That dog loved his squeakies. What a sweat face.

My favorite photo of Sampson from a few years ago on a trip to Dog Beach in San Diego, CA. We all had so much fun.


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