Posts Tagged ‘stone sculpture’

10 Week Adventure coming to an end

March 26, 2016

It’s almost that time. The end to a 10 week long show in sunny Scottsdale Arizona. The Arizona Fine Art Expo ends next sunday April 3rd. Soon all the artists will be tearing down their booths, packing up and heading in all different directions, to their homes. That means long goodbyes to old and new friends, till next year, when we do this adventure all over again.

During this years show, Scott was able to create some new and very interesting sculptures. Being with a wide variety of fantastic artists over a 10 week period, allows for some fun collaborations and new ideas. What we take away from being at this show, can’t be found no other place else. Scott and I have lots of plans for some new designs, new techniques and new embellishments with the sculptures. We look forward to seeing how it all works out. Although we’ll miss the friends we have made over the years while going to AZ, we’ll be glad to stay put at home for a while and create for the upcoming summer shows.

Here are just a few of the most recent pieces that have been completed at the show. Scott has really been a busy beaver.

First two photos taken by Ron Kirk

Dazzel zap

“Dazzle” is a popular design that has a wavy vase shape. It was carved from Mesquite and has turquoise inlay.

two tunnels zap

“Two Tunnels” is a tunnel sculpture carved from Alligator Juniper with turquoise inlay. This photo captures a side view looking through the tunnel to the other side.

Below Photos were taken by Rose Photography

3 Ways Thru

“Three Ways Through” was carved from Pink Alabaster stone into the three tunnels. It has Padauk wood attached to the outer rims and used for the base. The stone is fast becoming one of our favorites to carve. Just look at the outcome.

mesquite boat vessel

“Journey” is a new design we just started creating. It is made from a mesquite log, into this boat shape, with the bark carefully left in place, and has turquoise inlayed. It seems to be hovering on this stone base, making it a great table center piece.

Mini Entangled

“Mini Entangled” is a smaller version of a 6ft sculpture we made 2 years ago, standing at approximately 32″ tall. This one is much easier to bring around. It is carved from mesquite into this spiral shape with a few small tunnels. The bark was carefully left in place, which was no easy task on this one. This sculpture has a lot of motion to it.

See Thru

“See Thru” has been a popular canyon design with the hole going through it. This is the first one that has been carved from Ironwood. This piece is very dark and with the hole in the middle, is very striking.

Stars in your eye

“Stars in your Eyes” is a dainty vase shaped vessel carved from Ironwood. The large cracks allowed for Opal to be inlayed, along with multi stones such as turquoise, coral, malachite, lapis, sugalite, melon and canary. Some of them lay in a bed of Variegated Gold Leaf to make them pop. I love the contrast of the brown to the black in this wood and the multi colored stones really make it sparkle.

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Creating attachments to your art

November 17, 2015

As artists we create our art not only because we love what we do, but to sell, so someone else can enjoy it. Sometimes there are those special creations that we hold near and dear and are harder to let go of. We’ve had our share of those and every once in a while we may keep one. But most of the time we have to part with a favorite piece, because someone else falls in love with it as much as we did.

The newest pieces we just completed were no exception. The finish barely had time to dry before they were out the door and gone. A visit to a new wholesale account proved that attachments can be fleeting. So those new pieces will find wonderful homes and we’ll move on to create more one of a kind sculptures for more people.

Mesquite burl tunnel

One such piece to not be around long is this Mesquite Burl Tunnel. The incredible burling of the mesquite is pretty rare and such a find. Scott carved two tunnels on either end with a large opening in the middle. This piece had such natural beauty and so many inclusions, cracks and voids, that we decided to not add any inlay. That was definitely the right choice on this piece.

Soon we head to Arizona again for the 10 week show. However, this year we will be heading back to the Arizona Fine Art Expo that we did a few years ago. An opportunity was presented to us by our good friends, painter TJ and Lori Thompson (www.thompyart.com) to split a double booth. He takes the walls and we get the floor. This gallery type setup should look incredible and allow us to really show off our sculptures. Switching back to Arizona Fine Art Expo also allows us to work a lot better, meaning we will be able to build a good inventory for next years summer shows. We look forward to this booth setup with our good friends TJ and Lori and getting reacquainted with all the other artists at Expo. Arizona Fine Art Expo starts January 22 and ends April 3rd 2016 and takes place at the NW corner of Scottsdale Rd and Jomax Rd. For more info on the show go to http://www.arizonafineartexpo.com

Here are a few more of those new pieces

Dazzel

“Dazzle” was one of the pieces just completed. It was a nice wavy vessel carved from Acacia, with the bark carefully left in place and has turquoise inlayed. It resembles mesquite in many ways with the yellow sap wood.

Ironwood Tunnel

This Tunnel vessel was carved from AZ Ironwood. A long tunnel was carved through the piece and a small bowl shape was carved on the top. Then the large cracks that filled the piece were filled with turquoise. Yes that is the natural color of that wood. It’s incredible.

turquoise stone vessel

This was just one of the smaller pieces from our new “Topper” designs. We started creating them to reach a larger audience of collectors with small to medium sized vessels. These hollowed out vessels have different features incorporated like, gold leafing, copper or bronze patina and stone inlays. The toppers vary from a stone, gem, geode, rocks and more. This one was carved from Mesquite, has turquoise inlayed and the hand made topper has a turquoise rock on it. We have fun with these pieces, adding some kind of unique artistic touch.

Flame

“FLAME”
Some of you, from Face Book, might remember this Oak Burl in the beginning stage, when we were getting your opinion on whether to load it with turquoise or just slightly add it. Well I went in between and did a fair amount of turquoise, but didn’t totally load it. I think the finished piece speaks for itself. It’s GORGEOUS.

We’ll be working on creating some very exciting sculptures in various sizes, along with a good assortment of small to medium vessels over the next two months. I’m sure time will fly by before leaving for AZ, so there are no plans to do anything, but work work work.

The Art of Creativity

June 29, 2015

CREATIVITY. Some are born with it, some work very hard to try and achieve it. Scott was blessed with a very creative mind and works hard to constantly improve his skills and keep the creativity flowing. Being creative and thinking of new designs and ideas seems to come easy for some, like Scott. That is why he enjoys carving the sculptures. He is always thinking and talking sculpture. It definitely consumes our lives. But we are glad we chose this lifestyle for a living. Not many can do it. It is definitely not easy. But nothing worthwhile in life is easy. You have to work hard for it. Mold it. Feed it. Sacrifice for it. That is what it’s like being an artist.

scott working resize

So how does Scott’s creative process start? From a LOG. He can look at a log and have an idea in mind of what that log will soon become. He very rarely sketches his ideas. He just thinks of it and starts working. He then picks up a chainsaw and sets out creating that design. When the rough process is done, he switches over to grinders. The above picture is a 6ft tall sculpture that is currently in the carving stage. It was a very large mesquite log that Scott picked up from a woodturner friend in Scottsdale. The log was so large and heavy, he had to rough carve it there, before loading it on the trailer and transporting it back home. The sculpture will have several tunnels with large wavy openings carved into it and will stand on a cement base. It will be completed in time for the Sculpture in the Park show, in Loveland CO, August 8-9. It is sure to be a real spectacular piece.

Vision resize

Even though some artists are born with the creative bug, it doesn’t mean they don’t have to work hard for it from time to time. It does take practice, patience and discipline to keep those creative juices going. That is why we have so many logs on hand, that range in the type of wood and size. Sometimes the design jumps out at you like when Scott saw the Ironwood log that would soon become “Vision” (Pictured above), he knew instantly what he wanted to do with it. He carved down the branches that were coming out to create tunnels and carefully incorporated the yellow sap wood to make it wrap around the tunnels. It turned out spectacular. But there are other times when he can stare at a log and not have any idea what he wants to do with it. So it sits till one day that vision finally forms. And we have quite a few of those waiting logs. Yet other times he has an idea in mind and sets out hunting for that perfect log to create that idea.

SS_20150324_53_e

“NESTLED” above is one of those, “I have an idea, let me find the right logs”. It consisted of several pieces that are specially carved to nestle into each other. The main pieces are made from mesquite. Then there is a small juniper and ironwood piece that snuggle in small openings. Multi stones were inlayed to add a lot of color and two gold leaf balls add some whimsy. Scott has plans to do several of these out of different woods and in various sizes. He also wants to do wall sculptures that are similar in design. We are always striving to improve and stay one step ahead.

So being creative does take work and constant practice to perfect your skills. Even if you are born with the creative bug. It can also be very satisfying and rewarding and we wouldn’t trade the life for anything.

Chairs and Carving Stone, Oh My!

December 14, 2014

It’s been another busy year for us here in the land of Shangrila. A year of chairs and Sculptures. We tried a new experiment with our summer shows, of bringing only the carved sculptures. And it paid off. We finished our summer shows wiped out of inventory. And on top of that, we got quite a few chair orders off the internet. So all my hard work on the website and getting us out there in the world wide web, paid off.

A Rocken Mom
One exciting thing was a last minute rocking chair order for an expectant mother. A surprise from the husband and a few custom ideas turned out a beautiful rocker. It was made from highly figured black walnut with Koa accents.
hester wife close up
Here mom to be is trying out the rocker for the first time. It’s arrival was just in time for her to go into labor. So we couldn’t have timed that any closer. We’re glad that baby and mom can enjoy the rocker.

Eight is Enough
This next photo is the set of 8 Black Walnut Horn Back chairs that we just finished up in time to used for Christmas dinner.
Green 8 chairs

Big Collector
We finished up an order for a big collector that included 6 chairs. The black walnut with purple heart horn back chairs finished up this table set.
Adam table set

His collection includes the below pieces.
Adam hemisphere table
This walnut Hemisphere table has purple heart bread board ends.
Adam settee
Walnut Settee
Adam hinge table
Walnut rocker and a mesquite wooden hinge pedestal table
Adam coat rack
Mahogany carved coat rack
Adam sculpture
Juniper Carved Sculpture

Carving Stone
We have been enjoying carving in the Alabaster Stone and Scott has gotten quite creative. We recently picked up some different colors in the stone, like Transparent Orange and Peach. We should have a nice variety of Alabaster pieces this next year at Celebration of Fine Art, like this tunnel piece, “Three Ways Through”.
Three Ways Thru

Even though we are scrambling to get new pieces done for Celebration, because we had such a busy year, we count ourselves very blessed. It’s been a very busy year both with the business and at the homefront with all the projects we’ve had going on at home. We’re looking forward to next year and what surprises it holds.

Carving Alabaster

July 3, 2014

Image

The Alabaster Stone in large 90# blocks, ready for something creative to take place and reveal the beauty within.

Recently we started carving Alabaster stone. We’ve been wanting to try it out for some time.  Although it can be carved and sanded with the same tools, it has proven to be more challenging and quite a bit messier. Just like “Pig Pen” from the Peanuts cartoon, a white cloud follows us when we work with it. Scott has found that he unfortunately can’t use the chainsaw on it, due to the aggressive nature of it because the stone will break apart much easier. So it takes longer to use the grinders to carve intricate designs. And due to the hairline cracks that may exist in the stone, he has to be careful during the carving process or the whole piece will just crack wide open. We are enjoying the new medium and the different element it allows us to show. Scott’s creative juices can really flow and grow carving the stone.

Image

The color variations in the Alabaster is incredible. The above bowl was made from the Pink Alabaster and has Ebony wood on the rim. This was one of the first pieces Scott carved. He created some curves and gentle waves to bring out the beautiful colors. The Ebony wood rim adds an incredible contrast between the colors.

grey alabaster vessel

This piece was one of the most recent created. It is a Grey Alabaster. The stone was odd shaped, so this canyon shape was created. The grey stone has a different array of colors going through, like, green, tan, white and grey.

purple heart and alabaster

This was also carved from a small piece of the Grey Alabaster and has Purple Heart on the rim.

three ways through

This beauty was carved from a large block of the Red Alabaster and has Bubinga wood attached to the tunnel openings and used for the base. Three tunnels were carved out of the stone creating this incredible sculpture. The red of the Bubinga shows off all the red tones in the stones. You have to see this piece in person to really appreciate how beautiful it is.